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September 25th 2008: The de Young Museum


Page 1 of 2.
Click on images below to enlarge:
Pizzetta 211
My pizza from Pizzetta 211: sun-dried tomato,
fluffy ricotta, arugula, and two perfectly soft sunny-side-up eggs.  The
crust was crisp, dark, but nowhere burned.  Despite my reaction that I'm
not sure what I think of egg on a pizza, it's clear they really know how
to cook a pizza.
My pizza from Pizzetta 211: sun-dried tomato, fluffy ricotta, arugula, and two perfectly soft sunny-side-up eggs. The crust was crisp, dark, but nowhere burned. Despite my reaction that I'm not sure what I think of egg on a pizza, it's clear they really know how to cook a pizza.
de Young Museum
The de Young
Museum and its tower.
No Picture Associated With These Comments
An explanation of Andy Goldsworthy's Drawn Stone installation. 
Interesting idea.  Sorry, I didn't take a picture of the crack; it was
simply a crack.  I like the sentiment expressed in the last sentence
of this plaque. Goldsworthy notes that this
installation has a subtly subversive quality, challenging viewers'
conceptions of what constitutes a work of art and drawing attention to
the power of nature to undermine or destroy even the most monumental
works created by humans.
A large glass Fruit Still Life.  It reminded me of similar piece
I saw
in Atlanta.
The de Young Museum and its tower.
I did not take pictures of the Chihuly exhibit. For descriptions of it, see my blog.
An explanation of Andy Goldsworthy's Drawn Stone installation. Interesting idea. Sorry, I didn't take a picture of the crack; it was simply a crack.
I like the sentiment expressed in the last sentence of this plaque. Goldsworthy notes that this installation has a subtly subversive quality, challenging viewers' conceptions of what constitutes a work of art and drawing attention to the power of nature to undermine or destroy even the most monumental works created by humans.
A large glass Fruit Still Life. It reminded me of similar piece I saw in Atlanta.
Gustav & Ulla Kraitz's Apples.  It also reminded me of that piece
in Atlanta.
This room had what appeared to be raindrops hanging from the ceiling. 
And a lawn chair.
Miguel Covarrubias's lively and life-ful The Fauna and Flora of the
Pacific.
Information about the mural in the previous picture, and about others in
the set.  I found interesting the paragraph (the third) on how the
murals were made.   Also, I want to know more details about the
missing Art and Culture mural, but I can't find any articles
about it on the web.
Gustav & Ulla Kraitz's Apples. It also reminded me of that piece in Atlanta.
This room had what appeared to be raindrops hanging from the ceiling. And a lawn chair.
Miguel Covarrubias's lively and life-ful The Fauna and Flora of the Pacific.
Information about the mural in the previous picture, and about others in the set. I found interesting the paragraph (the third) on how the murals were made.
Also, I want to know more details about the missing Art and Culture mural, but I can't find any articles about it on the web.
Jon Kuhn's Portals of Andromeda, a complex, multi-faceted,
glass-within-glass sculpture that this picture does not do justice.
A movie in which the camera glides around the aforementioned piece,
showing through movement how the internal glass does funny things to the
eye.
Klaus Moje's Untitled (#7).
Nicolas Africano's Untitled is a woman made of glass.
Jon Kuhn's Portals of Andromeda, a complex, multi-faceted, glass-within-glass sculpture that this picture does not do justice.
A movie in which the camera glides around the aforementioned piece, showing through movement how the internal glass does funny things to the eye.
Klaus Moje's Untitled (#7).
Nicolas Africano's Untitled is a woman made of glass.
Chihuly's Green Leaf Venetian, shown in the museum proper, not
part of the special exhibit.
Cornelia Parker's Anti-Mass.  This three-dimensional piece has a
disturbing story, shown in the next picture.
The story describing the piece shown in the previous picture.
Sono Osato's Meena has depth.  It feels morbid.
Chihuly's Green Leaf Venetian, shown in the museum proper, not part of the special exhibit.
Cornelia Parker's Anti-Mass. This three-dimensional piece has a disturbing story, shown in the next picture.
The story describing the piece shown in the previous picture.
Sono Osato's Meena has depth. It feels morbid.
Wayne Thiebaud's Three Machines.  When you read the plaque
(next), you'll understand why I photographed this piece.
The explanation of the aforementioned painting.
Enrico Donati's Trouble-fête is unnerving, fantastical,
and unearthly.
George C. Ault's Highland Light.  I photographed it to capture
the crispness of its light.
Wayne Thiebaud's Three Machines. When you read the plaque (next), you'll understand why I photographed this piece.
The explanation of the aforementioned painting.
Enrico Donati's Trouble-fête is unnerving, fantastical, and unearthly.
George C. Ault's Highland Light. I photographed it to capture the crispness of its light.
Chiura Obata's Untitled (Alma).  The landscape feels oddly out of
focus.
An explanation of the following video.
A video of a series of wire sculptures by Ruth Awawa.  I like the shadows.
Timothy Horn's Mother-Load.
Chiura Obata's Untitled (Alma). The landscape feels oddly out of focus.
An explanation of the following video.
A video of a series of wire sculptures by Ruth Awawa. I like the shadows.
Timothy Horn's Mother-Load.
No Picture Associated With These Comments
Timothy Horn's chandelier Diadem, and a self-portrait.
Thomas Moran's Grand Canyon with Rainbow.
Bierstadt's California Spring.
The labels of some vases on the second floor distinguished between pieces by Louis Comfort Tiffany, pieces from the studio of Louis Comfort Tiffany, and pieces from the Tiffany Glass & Decorating Company. I can't recall noticing any other museums making this distinction.
Timothy Horn's chandelier Diadem, and a self-portrait.
Thomas Moran's Grand Canyon with Rainbow.
Bierstadt's California Spring.
Frederic Edwin Church's Rainy Season in the Tropics must be
embellished.  A full rainbow?  Come on.
Sanford Robinson Gifford's A View from the Berkshire Hills, near
Pittsfield, Massachusetts shows, in person, how light can filter
through the air.  This picture doesn't capture the effect at all.
No Picture Associated With These Comments
An explanation of the "trompe l'oeil" style of painting.  It applies to
the next two paintings I photographed.
Frederic Edwin Church's Rainy Season in the Tropics must be embellished. A full rainbow? Come on.
Sanford Robinson Gifford's A View from the Berkshire Hills, near Pittsfield, Massachusetts shows, in person, how light can filter through the air. This picture doesn't capture the effect at all.
There was one room of still lifes, with one wall of artists' takes on a bowl of fruit, and another wall of dead animals.
An explanation of the "trompe l'oeil" style of painting. It applies to the next two paintings I photographed.
Bierstadt's Sunlight and Shadow has amazing, well, sunlight and
shadow.  I love Bierstadt's non-religious paintings.
Jerome Thompson's Recreation has incredible detail: leaves,
hairs, petals, ...
Gustav Grunewald's Horseshoe Falls from below the High Bank
(left) and The Niagra River at the Cataract (right).
No Picture Associated With These Comments
Bierstadt's Sunlight and Shadow has amazing, well, sunlight and shadow. I love Bierstadt's non-religious paintings.
Jerome Thompson's Recreation has incredible detail: leaves, hairs, petals, ...
Gustav Grunewald's Horseshoe Falls from below the High Bank (left) and The Niagra River at the Cataract (right).
A row of shining, polished antique cabinets glowed like new.